programming

  • HackerNest posted an article
    A short podcast interview on why you should or shouldn’t run a hackathon! see more

    HackerNest has produced very many hackathons, and we're here to tell you things that many wont. Check out this 50 minute interview by the Developer Marketing Podcast (run by SlashData) where Shaharris (HackerNest CEO and quarterback for all the banner hackathons that we have run) talks about why you should or shouldn’t run a hackathon! This topic comes up all the time and groups, companies, individuals are running a whole gambit of them around the world - unfortunately, although many look spectacular, the net effect of these programming competitions and the goals sought by the producers fall short. 

    Very rarely do you see a hackathon producer (we’ve run them in dozens upon dozens of cities around the world in the last decade) take a contrarian stance and actually tell you to avoid them if your goals don’t align with what these programming competitions actually produce!

     

     

    From Slashdata:

     

    Shaharris, CEO of HackerNest joins us on our first episode of season 2 to discuss hackathons. He talks about the benefits of running a hackathon, the reasons why you shouldn't run a hackathon and what aspects make a group of developers a real community.

     
     

    Here’s a fleshed out 12 reasons public hackathons fail (Disclaimer: No flowery language or elegant arguments; just a list of reasons why your company/organization shouldn't run public innovation hackathons.) that’ll give you more insight into the gaps in this overhyped innovation method! 

     

    1 Hackathons don't solve important or persistent problems

    2 Output isn't likely to be "something amazing"

    3 Winners aren't always winners; cheating is common

    4 Hackathons are wasteful, inefficient, and demoralizing

    5 (Good) Hackathons get expensive

    6 Judges don't have magical skills

    7 Judging is pretty ridiculous

    8 Hackathon demo and judging processes are usually an afterthought

    9 Participants aren't experts; mentors can only help so much

    10 The overwhelming majority of teams don't (plan to) survive the weekend

    11 IP is handled really, really awkwardly. And badly

    12 Hackathons aren't great for ideation

     

    Many of the people at our Tech Socials have also participated in and mentored at hackathons (both ours and others!). Meet them at one of our events!! Here’s our list of Tech Socials and also a short read on why it’s easy to make friends there.

  • HackerNest posted an article
    Tackle challenges around customer experience, transparency, and support for children and parents see more

    On the heels of CourtHack 2016’s success in Salt Lake City, HackerNest and the National Center for State Courts are partnering once again to bring you CourtHack 2.0! The event will take place April 22-23, 2017. This year, we’re in the tri-state area in New Brunswick, New Jersey at the New Jersey Law Center. Once again, carefully-curated challenge sets will aim to provide those living in the United States with greater access to justice.

    Last year, over 75 participants formed 16 teams across four challenge sets. The winner, Robot Lawyer, created a text-based app for navigating and filing court appeals and claims. For their amazing work, they took home $5,500 cash and a trip to Las Vegas to the e-Courts Conference, where they demoed for industry professionals. You can watch them present here.

    CourtHack 2.0 aims to bring together over 100 technologists, legal professionals, and business leaders to tackle challenges around customer experience, transparency, and support for children and parents in the legal system, and more. Hackers will be able to pull from anonymized data and have access to mentors from the National Center for State Courts and other subject matter experts.

    Our hackathons feature mentors of the highest caliber because we want to give each team the best shot at not only taking home a prize, but also at forming a viable business based on their solution. Partnering mentors up with teams helps ensure that the projects they’re working on are relevant and useful. HackerNest helps push hackathon projects towards market readiness.

    Registration for CourtHack 2.0 is now open! Spots are limited, so be sure to secure yours early. We’ll see you in New Jersey on April 22!

    Here’s a glimpse of how some of our planning meetings go (can’t wait for more of them!):